An article in the gadgets and gears section of the Ars Technica website written shortly after the 2010 Consumer Electronics Show in New York predicted that we are all going to own a 3D television set a few years from now whether we want to or not. According to the author, the simple reason behind this forecast is the fact that television manufacturers have already said so.

As jaded as that statement may sound, it does have a ring of truth to it. Manufacturers of any product can dictate the demand for their products by manipulating available supply in the market. If manufacturers like Samsung, Sony and Phillips have deemed that it is now the age of 3D TV and offer us nothing but 3D TVs to buy, we do not exactly have a choice unless we opt to forego watching television altogether.

Nonetheless, we have nothing to worry about, at least for now. Television manufacturers may have invested money towards the development of 3D technology for the television, but it will take years for this technology to become a real form of home entertainment for the average electronics consumer. To date, the United States alone is still in the process of switching the television signals it broadcasts from analog to HD. It will take years for stations all over the world to convert their systems from HD to 3D.

Besides, there is not a lot of 3D content available yet for regular television viewers to watch at home. Industry insiders do report that ESPN, among other channels, is developing a system where its viewers can watch the sports events it broadcasts in 3D. However, as stated above, this will take years to accomplish.

It is not far-fetched to think that television manufacturers are using the technology for 3D television to manipulate supply and demand in the market again. We may have to prepare ourselves and get used to the idea that we will wear funky glasses just to be able to watch TV. But then again, who knows? Maybe the ride is worth it.

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